Law of Attraction.

Reporter: How are you sir?

Conor: How are you?

Reporter: Good. Congratulations.

Conor: Thank you.

Reporter: I was asking you on Thursday about his right hand —

Conor: Yeah.

Reporter: Can I tell you what you told me?

Conor: I said, his right hand would get him into trouble, that’s the shot I predicted. I said he’d overload on his right hand, I said I’d slip, I said I’d bang the left hook, and that’s what happened.

Reporter: Word for word, you said:

I felt when we starred down, I felt his right hand was twitching, which was a subtle tell for me. He is ready to unload that right hand and I feel that could be a downfall for him. If he lets that right hand go I will not be there. I simply enter the way I enter and that is enough. They either over extended or they shrink away. But either way it is not good for them. I will create traps and dead space inside that octagon and I will walk him into that dead space but all of the sudden he will be in danger.

Reporter: How do you do that? How do you predict these things?

Connor: If you can see it here, and you have the courage enough to speak it, it will happen. I see these shots, I see these sequences and I don’t shy away from them. A lot of times people believe in certain things but they keep to themselves. They don’t put it out there. If you truly believe in it, if you become vocal with it, you are creating that law of attraction and it will become reality. I knew he would over extended and I knew I would catch him.

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Galileo V

Mallory: I spoke to my dad, I’m sorry about Galileo.

Sam: They’ve got a lot of tests they can still try.

Mallory: How much is it going to cost to try them?

Sam: Don’t start with me.

Mallory: I’m asking as a taxpayer. It costs $165 million to lose the thing, how much more money is it going to cost to make sure you’re never going to find it?

Sam: I don’t know Mallory but we certainly won’t divert any municipal tax dollars which are always best spent on new hockey arenas.

Mallory: No, its better spent feeding, and housing, and educating.

Sam: There are a lot of people in the world Mal and none of them are hungry because we went to the Moon. None of them are colder and certainly none of them are dumber because we went to the Moon.

Mallory: And we went to the Moon, do we really have to go to Mars?

Sam: Yes!

Mallory: Why?

Sam: Because its next. Because we came out of the cave – and we looked over the hill and we saw fire. And we crossed the ocean, and we pioneered the West and we took to the sky. The history of man is hung on a timeline of exploration and this is whats next.

capture

Pale Blue Dot

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From this distant vantage point the Earth might not seem of any particular interest; but for us, it is different. Consider again that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every ‘superstar’, every ‘supreme leader’, every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturing’s, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit? Yes. Settle? Not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.

sagancollection