Monday Morning

Real quick, this is just a rant. Very simple.

And something that I want you to pass on or watch every Monday morning because the level of complaining is unacceptable.

Look, what if I told you this was the last Monday morning of your life?

What if I told you you’d die this week?

Would you complain about your crap job or that test you don’t want to take?

I doubt it.

You’d go much higher level thinking. Well that’s really what it takes.

It takes understanding that if you’re not pumped right now, if you’re begrudging what you’re about to do, if you’re not looking forward to it — Look, I respect practicality:

You got to go through school because your parents want you to, you got to pay your rent, you got student loans, I get it.

But please recognize the world we are living in.

We are living in a world where there is so much more opportunity; this internet thing created way more opportunity for all of us. Way more.

I mean look, you might not even be alive.

Like, your mom and dad could have had sex like three minutes latter and you wouldn’t even exist, and you’re complaining. You could have ended up being a bus, a tree!

I just don’t get the mentality of being head-down sad on a Monday morning.

I’m going to make Monday morning my bitch!

I’m going to make you Saturday, Monday morning.

That’s what I want to do every morning, and thats what I want from you.

Please, take a step back and think about how awesome it actually is. And then, recognize that you can attack the world in a totally different way because you were lucky enough to be born during this era.

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Gary Vaynerchuck

Identity – by Jaret Grossman

One thing changes us, one thing. And that’s who we perceive ourselves to be. So I don’t care if you have to play mind ticks with yourself about where you came from or what genetics you’re born with or what skills you actually have. But its all about the culture that’s set within. See, its January first and you’ve got these resolutions right, well lets break down that word.

What are you trying to resolve? Whats in conflict? Well whats in conflict is, who you are right now is not who you want to be, or who you need to be, for that matter. See there’s a gap, and you have to understand that gap and you need to close it. How do you close it? Well first you make a decision. You decide right here right now, that you’re no longer going to keep up with this set of rituals that you’ve created for yourself. And your not going to call it “a set of rituals.” No no no no no.

You know it as sleeping nine and a half ours, as hitting the snooze button three times before you wake up, as checking facebook every time you hit your computer. But make no mistake about it, if you’re doing it every single day, then its a culture. Its a routine that you’ve set for yourself, and its about creating a new tone. Its about creating a new standard. Its about creating a new way of life.

So you decide to make a new pattern and you take action with it and you stay committed to it. Because you’re going to get pumped up, you’re gonna get excited, you’re gonna be energetic to wright down those resolutions or to make goals, to make that initial decision. But whats left after that energy fades? And I promise you it will fade.

Whats left is you. The measure of the man, the measure of the woman. Beyond the smoke, behind the mirrors, what is left is you. Your effort, when the energy fades do you stay true to your word? Because your word is your bond. You made a promise, are you going to stick to that pact?

Decision, action, and commitment. That’s what forms a new identity. Because that’s the one thing that changes us. See, politics aside, Marcus Luttrell made up in his mind that he wasn’t going to die on that mountain top. He knew in his heart of hearts that he wasn’t going to go out that way. That’s how you can get through broken bones. That’s how Michael Jordan is able to have, what most people would call a “career game,” with the flu. That’s how Michael Phelps wins his seventh medal by one one-hundredth of a second.

He is getting dominated the entire race, his hands are all the way back just before the other guy is going to touch the wall – and before you can blink, he is able to touch the wall. That’s not motivation, that’s not passion, that’s not skill, that’s not even desire. That’s not wanting it more than the other person – that’s identifying with something so deep. That’s something resonating inside you that says “I do not lose. This is who I am. And there is no alternative, this is how its going to be.”

And that’s when you change long term. See you’ve got weak parts, and you’ve got strong parts. Its about which one you’re going to reinforce. See Kobe Bryant, he knew he had to divide himself. He had to separate his personal struggles from when he stepped onto the court, that’s why he created the Black Mamba. You’ve got weak parts and you’ve got strong parts, that you’ve got to be able to flip the switch and know when the ruthless, competitive, that killer instinct is going to come out.

This new identity that you formed for yourself, who do you see yourself as?

Who do you really see yourself as?

Because when that changes, then the mechanics change.

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Undecideds

Good morning.

My prayers are with Ronnie Burke’s family today, I know yours are too. My prayers are with Officer Rafael Martinez and his family – they are not struggling with the loss of a child, but they are struggling with a terrible truth. My prayers are with those families, and with this one.

You know, I find myself on days like this casting about… for someone to blame. I blame the kid he stole a car. I blame the parents, why couldn’t they teach him better? I blame the cop, did he need to fire? I blame everyone I can think of and I am filled with rage.

And then I try and find compassion. Compassion for the people I blame. Compassion for the people I do not understand. Compassion. Doesn’t always work so well.

I remember as a young man listening on the radio to Dr. King in 1968, he asked of us compassion and we responded. Not necessarily because we felt it but because he… convinced us that if we could find compassion, if we could, express compassion, and if we could just pretend compassion, it would heal us, so much more than vengeance could.

And he was right, it did. But not enough.

What we’ve learned this week is that more compassion is required of us and an even greater effort is required of us. And we are all, I think, everyone of us, tired. We’re tired of understanding. We’re tired of waiting. We’re tired of trying to figure out why our children are not safe and why our efforts to make them safe seem to fail. We’re tired.

But, we must know that we have made some progress. And blame will only destroy it. Blame will breed more violence and we have had enough of that. Blame will not rid our streets of crime, and drugs, and fear and we have had enough of that. Blame will not strengthen our schools, or our families, or our workforce – blame will rob us of those things. And we have had enough of that.

And so I ask you today to dig down deep with me and find that compassion in your hearts. Because it will keep us on the road. And we will walk together, and work together. And slowly, slowly, too slowly, things will get better.

God bless you. God bless you, and God bless your children.

santos

 

The Ambiguous Intensity of Eye Contact

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Opia

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So much can be said in a glance.

Such ambiguous intensity, both invasive and vulnerable—glittering black, bottomless and opaque.

The eye is a keyhole, through which the world pours in and a world spills out.

And for a few seconds, you can peek through into a vault, that contains everything they are.

Whether the eyes are the windows of the soul or the doors of perception, it doesn’t matter: you’re still standing on the outside of the house.

Eye contact isn’t really contact at all. It’s only ever a glance, a near miss, that you can only feel as it slips past you.

There’s so much we keep in the back room.

We offer up a sample of who we are, of what we think people want us to be. But so rarely do we stop to look inside, and let our eyes adjust, and see what’s really there.

Because you too are peering out from behind your own door.

You put yourself out there, trying to decide how much of the world to let in. It’s all too easy for others to size you up, and carry on their way.

They can see you more clearly than you ever could. Yours is the only vault you can’t see into, that you can’t size up in an instant.

So we’re all just exchanging glances, trying to tell each other who we are, trying to catch a glimpse of ourselves, feeling around in the darkness.

The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

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The Awareness of How Little of the World You’ll Experience

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Onism

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You are here.

You were lost at first, but soon began sketching yourself a map of the world—plotting the contours of your life.

And like the first explorers, sooner or later you have to contend with the blank spaces on the map.

All the experiences you’ve never had. The part of you still aching to know what’s out there.

Eventually these questions take on a weight of their own, and begin looming over your everyday life.

All the billions of doors you had to close in order to take a single step forward.

All the things you haven’t done and may never get around to doing;

all the risks that may or may not have been real;

all the destinations you didn’t buy a ticket to;

all the lights you see in the distance that you can only wonder about;

all the alternate histories you narrowly avoided;

all the fantasies that stay dormant inside your head:

everything you’re giving up, to be where you are right now:

the questions that you wrongly assume are unanswerable.

It’s strange how little of the universe we actually get to see.

Strange how many assumptions we have to make just to get by, stuck in only one body, in only one place at a time.

Strange how many excuses we’ve invented to explain why so much of life belongs in the background.

Strange that any of us could ever feel at home on such an alien world.

We sketch monsters on the map because we find their presence comforting.

They guard the edges of the abyss, and force us to look away; so we can live comfortably in the known world, at least for a little while.

But if someone were to ask you on your deathbed what it was like to live here on Earth, perhaps the only honest answer would be,

“I don’t know. I passed through it once, but I’ve never really been there.”

The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

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The Part of Your Identity That Doesn’t Fit Into Categories

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Lutalica.

You tell the world who you are
In a million different ways.
Some are subtle, some are not.

But it doesn’t seem to matter:
This world has already got you pegged.

When you were born they put you in a little box,
And slapped a label on it.
So they could keep things organized,
And not have to think about what’s inside.

Over time you learn to make yourself comfortable
Packaging your identity in different combinations
Until you feel like you belong,
And can wear your labels proudly.

But there’s a part of you that never found a home
Rattling around in categories that never really did you justice.

You look around at other people,
Trying to judge how loosely they fit in their own lives
Sensing a knot of confusion hidden beneath a name tag.

And you realize we’re still only strangers,
Who assume we already know what the other is going to say,
As if the only thing left to talk about is
Who belongs in what category
And which labels are offensive.

You have to wonder if these boxes are falling apart.
If we should be writing our identities by hand,
And speak only for ourselves, in our own words,
So we could take our chances out in the open
And meet each other as we are,
Asking: “What is it like being you?”

—And be brave enough to admit
That we don’t already know the answer.

Maybe it’ll mean that we’ve finally arrived,
Just “unpacking the boxes”
Making ourselves at home.

And maybe one day we’ll look back and wonder
How we managed to live together in the same house for so long,
And never stopped to introduce ourselves.

The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

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The Joy of Discovery

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There is a question that troubles us all,

From the time we are first able to think,

And that is: Where did we come from?

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And this question is so compelling,

That we’ve invented the science of astronomy.

We’ve discovered these natural laws so that

We can learn more about our origin and where we came from.

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This is what drives us. This is what we want to know.

Let’s keep looking. Let’s keep searching.

We have come to be because of the universe’s existence,

And we are driven to pursue that. To find out where we came from.

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The joy of discovery, that’s what drives us.

And these questions are deep within us.

Where did we come from?

What was before the Big Bang?

To us this is wonderful and charming and compelling.

This is what makes us get up and go to work every day.

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We are,

You and I,

At least one of the ways,

That the universe knows itself.

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It fills me with joy to make discoveries everyday of things I’ve never seen before.

To know that we can pursue these answers.

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Where did we come from?

bill nye

~ Bill Nye ~

Transcript created from a video by Melodysheep:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p0_YHVFoXkM